The Winding Road From Coal To Code

“Nary a month goes by without an announcement of some new effort to train displaced coal miners to code. The appeal of mixing coal and code is approaching the once dizzying heights of “green jobs.” After all, what better way to address Appalachia’s many challenges and leapfrog to the 21st century than by transforming tens of thousands of coal miners into coders? So policy makers and social entrepreneurs are parroting lines like “we’re not shipping coal out of here anymore; we’re shipping code.” At this point, there may be more such efforts in West Virginia and Kentucky than hardluck stories in Hillbilly Elegy.”

Read moreThe Winding Road From Coal To Code

Program Aims To Place Minorities In Construction Careers

“A program that helps women and minorities in Indianapolis and Gary find jobs in the union construction industry is growing and hopes to expand to other cities in the state. Indiana Plan for Equal Employment is a not-for-profit started in 1970 from a push by President Lyndon B. Johnson to recruit disadvantaged populations into the building trades. It receives public and private funding, including an annual grant from the Indiana Department of Workforce Development (DWD).

Read moreProgram Aims To Place Minorities In Construction Careers

From choosing a major to buying textbooks: 7 ways to save money on college

“As the cost of college climbs, many students have no choice but to rack up piles of debt in an effort to pay for their degrees. But the lower you manage to keep your college costs, the easier it’ll be to keep your student loans to a minimum. Here are a few tactics for saving money on college – and avoiding an unhealthy level of debt in the process. The less money you spend on college, the less likely you are to wind up with an unmanageable level of student debt. It pays to explore your options for lowering your college costs, even if it means making a few adjustments or sacrifices along the way. “

Read moreFrom choosing a major to buying textbooks: 7 ways to save money on college

Community Colleges to Add New Apprenticeships to Work Force

“The nation’s leading association for community colleges is helping its member institutions focus on building more apprenticeship programs and becoming experts for work-force development in their communities. Community colleges were successful at getting more students into college during the last century, Walter Bumphus, president and chief executive officer of the American Association of Community Colleges, said during the group’s 99th annual convention in Orlando this weekend, but more work is required to close racial and economic equity gaps in academic achievement and guaranteeing graduates are employed in well-paying jobs.”

Read moreCommunity Colleges to Add New Apprenticeships to Work Force

The best tools and tips for finding a college you can afford, according to a financial aid expert

“With constant news coverage of the $1.6 trillion student-debt crisis and the ways colleges, corporations and politicians propose reducing costs, it’s hard to ignore the fact that college is an expensive investment. There’s an especially dangerous side effect of so much focus on extreme college costs: Some students — often those who are most eligible for financial aid — are scared away from applying to college at all. But the reality is that a college degree is still one of the best ways to get ahead financially. Skipping college could end up costing more in lost wages over time. College costs can be prohibitive in some cases, but there are ways to search for, and apply to, colleges that will be affordable for your family.”

Read moreThe best tools and tips for finding a college you can afford, according to a financial aid expert

We thought our son would attend a four-year college. Now it’s our turn to learn

“There are times in your parenting journey when confidence sets in and things hum along smoothly for a while. Then there are days when you lock yourself in your bathroom with a bag of Milano cookies questioning every interaction you’ve ever had with your kids. I spend most of the time somewhere in between, but keep my Milanos close at hand, just in case. These days, I feel like those confident parenting moments are less frequent. Perhaps because my role is shifting as my 17-year-old twin sons are figuring out their next steps.”

Read moreWe thought our son would attend a four-year college. Now it’s our turn to learn

Providing alternatives for adult educational needs

“To meet the demands of developing a trained workforce in Maine, adult education programs provide education and training for citizens that are currently not in the workforce or are seeking to improve their credentials to upgrade their employment options. Houlton-Hodgdon Adult and Community Education center meets these demands under the Maine College and Career Access grant by focusing on free programming for college readiness and enrollment into post secondary programs.”

Read moreProviding alternatives for adult educational needs

Is College Worth The Money?

“I graduated from Texas Christian University with a bachelor’s degree in fashion merchandising and a minor in French. Two years later, I was working as a writer for Williams-Sonoma, and thereafter spent the remainder of my career in writing and journalism―making my college education largely null and void. One could argue that there is worth in a liberal arts education, even if the larger focus of my studies went unused, and that might be true. But I can’t help but wonder if it was worth $100,000―the total sum spent on my college education by the time I graduated in 2007.”

Read moreIs College Worth The Money?

Will a Bachelor’s Degree Matter as Much for Gen Z?

“College has changed a great deal in the last 25 years. For one thing, we have an urgent crisis of college affordability. Due to skyrocketing tuition, the average student in the U.S. now graduates with about $30,000 in student loans. Simultaneously, colleges are facing crises of completion — only about 50% of matriculating students ever complete a degree — and employability. More than 40% of new and recent graduates are underemployed in their first job. And for those who are underemployed in their first job, two thirds are underemployed five years later, and half are underemployed a decade later.”

Read moreWill a Bachelor’s Degree Matter as Much for Gen Z?

Dave Ramsey tells students: Skip the ‘dream’ college and go to school where you can afford

“About 40% of students say that when it comes to picking which college they will attend, the most determining factor is the “overall fit,” according to a recent survey by the Princeton Review. Only about 9% of students cited affordability as the most important element in choosing their school. That’s happening, in part, because parents, and society as a whole, are allowing students to “take a kid’s approach to an adult decision,” personal financial coach Anthony ONeal said during a Debt-Free Degree Town Hall event with personal finance expert and best-selling author Dave Ramsey.”

Read moreDave Ramsey tells students: Skip the ‘dream’ college and go to school where you can afford