Update on end point assessments for nursing workforce apprenticeships

“The Institute for Apprenticeships and Technical Education (IFATE) has announced further flexibilities for certain apprenticeships in response to the impact of COVID-19. These flexibilities apply to registered nurse degree apprentices and nursing associate apprentices, reflecting the adjustments made by the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) in light of the pandemic. “

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It might be time to think about a career change

“If you were laid-off during this pandemic and are scuffling to find a new job, it may be the right time to ask “Is it time for my second act?” That was the question Andy Levine asked Marci Alboher, vice president at Encore.org and the author of “The Encore Career Handbook” and myself in this recent podcast of Second Act Stories. It reminded me that this was the precise query many workers over 50 asked themselves in the aftermath of the Sept. 11 attacks. And many of them did just that — launching encore careers often in the nonprofit arena and starting their own businesses.”

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‘We’re on the edge of the precipice’: How the pandemic could shatter college dreams

“The pandemic and the nation’s brutal economic collapse are combining to crush the college hopes of low-income and first-generation students. Some high school seniors are dropping their first-choice schools in favor of colleges that are cheaper and closer to home, early surveys have found. Others are thinking about going part-time, or taking a gap year so they can work and bail out families whose breadwinners are suddenly out of work. Those who work with low-income students worry freshmen from poor families who were sent home this semester may never return and high school seniors won’t get the hands-on help they need with their financial aid applications.”

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Go to college or skip it? High school students face a new reality due to coronavirus

“American teens are worried about the financial impact of the coronavirus pandemic on their family — and on their future. According to a survey by Junior Achievement and Citizens Bank, 57% of teenagers said they were concerned about how Covid-19 will affect their life after high school. Of the high school juniors and seniors polled, 27% said their plans after graduation have changed and 44% said the pandemic has affected their plans to pay for college.”

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How Colleges And The Government Can Upskill Workers And Drive The Recovery

“It’s becoming a cliché to say that our world has changed. But our world has really, really changed. In February and early March, unemployment was at record lows. Wages were ticking up. Then the pandemic hit. Across the country, people are at home and businesses are shuttered. The International Monetary Fund now says we’re headed for the worst recession since the Great Depression.”

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College should not be the only path to a career

“With graduation season upon us, we celebrate our seniors’ accomplishments. But as thousands of graduates will soon flood the job market and struggle to pay off astronomically high student loans, our state should promote other paths to success besides a college diploma. High school seniors are constantly told to attend college. However, college is not the only path to success, and we actually need more people to explore alternative routes. Entering the workforce directly, joining the military and learning a trade are all excellent alternatives to attending college.”

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For older Americans who went back to college, the pandemic has destroyed decades-long graduation dreams

“Whether they flunked out “spectacularly,” just missed graduation or never went to college fresh out of high school, adult students say they’re feeling the hit from coronavirus canceling college as much as the 20-somethings. For some, the dream of graduating with a degree has been decades in the making. CNN spoke to three students who won’t be able to walk the stage. Adult learners, classified as college students aged 25 and older, made up 7.4 million of the 19.9 million students who were enrolled in colleges and universities in fall 2019, according to the National Center for Education Statistics.”

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Mohawk Collision trains, expands skills of young auto techs

“Fixing cars is in Donni’s blood, its only fitting its also his last name. “Since I’m young, my mom would buy me a toy and I would take it apart and put it back together, said Automotive Mechanical Technician Donni Karr. “So I feel it was from then.” And now he’s worked his way up in Mohawk Collision in Glenville. He says manager Gerry Rosenbarker saw potential in him.”

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After Coronavirus, Colleges Worry: Will Students Come Back?

“For years, Claire McCarville dreamed of going to college in New York or Los Angeles, and was thrilled last month to get accepted to selective schools in both places. But earlier this month, she sent a $300 deposit to Arizona State University, a 15-minute drive from her home in Phoenix. “It made more sense,” she said, “in light of the virus.” Across the country, students like Ms. McCarville are rethinking their choices in a world altered by the pandemic. And universities, concerned about the potential for shrinking enrollment and lost revenue, are making a wave of decisions in response that could profoundly alter the landscape of higher education for years to come.”

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