5 mistakes service members make when going back to school

“Choosing to serve in the military was an easy decision. Deciding what you want to do with your life can feel a little more daunting. Selecting a university and a program that’s right for you feels downright overwhelming. You know you can always go back to your hometown and get an entry level job in your mom’s / dad’s business; or, you might really want to pick a school that actually has a chance at winning some sort of bowl game and sells their fan gear on Amazon. Not to completely rule those out, as some of them have amazing programs, but shouldn’t you put some thought into finding a right-fit school for you? “

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The other college debt crisis: Schools are going broke

“Small, private liberal arts colleges — a staple of American academia since before the founding of the republic — are colliding with new realities including changing demographics, ever-increasing demand for technical skills and competition with bigger and richer schools. The result, in many cases, is not pretty. Moody’s Investor Services estimates 1 in 5 small private colleges faces “fundamental stress” due to declining revenues, rising expenses and little pricing power when it comes to tuition. Analysts project 15 of the colleges will have closed in 2019 — the largest number in recent memory, and three times the rate just 10 years ago.”

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National Apprenticeship Week Teaches Students About Different Career Opportunities

Students in Boyne City got the chance to learn about career opportunities through apprenticeships Tuesday. It’s part of National Apprenticeship Week, working to educate young people on the different opportunities for their futures. “Some of the stuff was, like I never even heard of it before, didn’t know there was options for jobs like that,” said one student in attendance. That’s really the goal of Northwest Michigan Works’ presentation, to teach students about the other options available outside of college. “Now we know that college isn’t for everybody, and if it’s not for you than get into an apprenticeship program that’s probably the best option,” said Devon Hayden, a Boyne City High School Senior.”

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Yes, your kid can get a degree with no debt, here’s how

“When it comes to a college education, many parents have accepted as fact that student loans are the gateway to financial freedom for their children. Think about that for a moment. Debt has become the default for families trying to ascend the economic ladder. But debt, when overused, can tip you over and make you crash. I’ve found that when people start with a promise to themselves and their children — a degree with no debt — they make different choices. And those choices help folks achieve real wealth sooner.”

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Toddles and textbooks: Navigating College as a single parent

“Essays and exams make up a tiny fraction of Naomi Lindsay’s stressors at Ohio State. She also has to make sure the Spiderman costume, canisters of Play-Doh and Buzz Lightyear action figures are cleaned up from her living room floor. Lindsay, a second-year in social work, returns to her two-bedroom apartment every day after picking up her 5-year-old son, Dominic, from school at the Columbus Bilingual Academy. After cooking dinner, giving Dominic a bath, reading bedtime stories and tucking him into bed, Lindsay is finally ready to start her pile of homework that is due the next day. If she’s lucky, she goes to bed by 1 a.m. She wakes up grudgingly, five hours later, at 6 a.m., drives Dominic to school and starts her day jam-packed with classes. Then it repeats. “

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The college your kids attend isn’t as important as the majors they choose

“The college-admissions scandal — which led to a 14-day prison sentence for actress Felicity Huffman — exposed a group of wealthy parents’ obsession with getting their kids into the “right” school. Prosecutors say the families paid bribes, faked test results and pretended their kids were athletes to get them into selective colleges. Unfortunately, many less affluent families also fall for the delusion that some schools offer golden tickets for their children’s futures, says Lynn O’Shaughnessy, author of “The College Solution.” Whether it’s an Ivy League college or a high-price “dream school,” too many people believe certain educations are worth endless effort, stress — and debt.”

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Young Americans’ View of Education

“On-the-job experience is best at preparing people for success, according to young Americans surveyed for the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research Higher Education Study. The center conducted a nationwide poll from August to September, garnering responses from more than 1,300 Americans between the ages of 13 and 29. The survey asked young people about their views of the education system from a variety of angles, including how it prepares them for success, how it handles mental health issues and what role affordability plays.”

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Higher Education Is college worth it? A Georgetown study measures return on investment — with some surprising results.

“When Larry Burrill started college, his goal was to walk into a job that paid well after graduation. He was coming from a family of humble means and knew he would be paying his way through school. He chose Maine Maritime Academy, set in a historic town miles down a peninsula, because he knew graduates were earning starting salaries double or triple what he could otherwise expect to make. That was back in the 1970s, but today, as a senior executive at an engineering services company he helped found (and as a father who paid for his children’s college educations), that practical approach makes more sense to him than ever. Higher education is so expensive now, he said, that few can afford the luxury of meandering through a liberal arts education without making hard calculations about employment prospects.”

Read moreHigher Education Is college worth it? A Georgetown study measures return on investment — with some surprising results.

Preparing high school grads for success through apprenticeship programs

“In honor of National Manufacturing Month this month and National Apprenticeship Week next month, I would like to discuss one of our area’s leading industries, advanced manufacturing, and spotlight an apprenticeship program that is preparing local high school graduates for real-world success and meeting workforce needs. Did you know that there are 140 manufacturers in Henderson County? These manufacturers employ 11 percent of our workforce – more than 5,700 people – and offer one of the highest average annual salaries at nearly $54,000 as compared to other industry sectors according to the Henderson County Partnership for Economic Development (HCPED).”

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Vt. trade union offering apprenticeship program

A local plumbing and pipe fitters union has an apprenticeship program they say can be an alternative to some negative aspects of further education, like debt and student loans. The Bureau of Labor Staistics says there has been a slight decline in union trade workers over the decades. However, national job website show plenty of trade jobs still need to be filled. In Vermont, Local 693 says its program is designed to take around five years to complete. They say you can work as you go to school to learn specific skills.

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